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Tyrone Biggums


Tyrone Biggums, The Lovable Addict

Chapelle Show - Tyrone BiggumsIllustrated by: Renaldho Pelle

I Smoke Rocks Joe Rogan!

I saw this come through as my Kuvva wallpaper the other day and couldn’t help but giggle to myself. Tyrone Biggums had a number of amazingly funny skits and to this day is definitely one of my favorite characters.

Cheers to Dave Chappelle and the comedic gold he as able to produce on cable television. I’m sure i’m not alone in hoping that we have many more greats like Chappelle appear in the not so distant future and push the comedic bar even higher.

Third Principle of Color Theory: Color Palettes and Color Harmony


Color Theory and Color Palette Creation

Color Palettes and Color Harmony

Warm vs. Cool Colors

The contrast of the warm and cool colors can be traced back to their respective hues observed in landscape light. Warm colors being associated with sunrise, daylight, sunset, and all light associated with the feeling of warmth. In contrast cool colors are associated with cold, gray, overcast light. Intrinsically these hues ‘feel’ either warm or cold and we intuitively associate colors with warm or cool.

Warm Colors

Warm colors tend to pop out and appear more forward in space. They also appear to be more stimulating and eye catching. Warm colors are described as hues from red through yellow, including brown.

Color Theory: Warm Color Palette

Cool Colors

Cool colors appear the opposite as they look like they recede back into space and appear more subdue and relaxed. Cool colors consist of hues from blue green through blue violet, including most gray colors.

Color Theory: Cool Color Palette

Complimentary Colors

Complimentary colors describe pairs of colors that create the strongest contrast between one another. Combining or mixing complementary colors in the right proportions produces white or black.

The most popular color compliments within the subtractive color model are red-green, yellow-purple and orange-blue. If you remember from our definition of warm and cool colors these complimentary colors are also either warm or cold, giving even more balance and harmony to color palettes that embrace these complimentary colors.

The most popular color compliments within the more accurate additive color model, or RGB model are red and cyan, green and magenta, and blue and yellow. You may have also noticed that these colors when viewed on the color wheel happen to be separated by exactly 180 degrees. Is this just a coincidence? I think not. Remember that mixing these two colors yields either black or white depending on the color model being used. Observe the color found between these two colors on the color wheel and you will find either black or white depending on the model being used.

Achromatic Colors

Achromatic colors lack any sort of hue or saturation. Achromatic colors and color palettes can include white, black, and all shades of gray in between. There are also color palettes that are nearly achromatic, which are called “near-neutral” palettes. You can remember this by noting that the prefix ‘a’ denotes ‘without’ and ‘chromatic’ is defined as the branch of colorimetry that deals with hue and saturation. Therefore when combined the word achromatic literally translates to ‘without hue or saturation.’

Achromatic colors and color palettes have the ability to enhance other colors and aide in navigating a viewers eye towards other colors containing hues. Designers often utilize this trick to grab a users eye or attention to direct them towards a specific action, or more aptly, a call to action.

Color Theory: Achromatic Color Palette

Monochromatic Colors

Monochromatic colors and color palettes are a set of colors that are derived from the same hue using a mixture of saturation and light. The prefix ‘mono’ denotes ‘single’ and again ‘chromatic’ is defined as the branch of colorimetry that deals with hue and saturation. When combined the word monochromatic translates to ‘single hue or saturation.’

Limiting the number of hues in a design or color palette creates a sense of stability, and is often used in conjunction with ‘professional’ design. Designs that use an abundance of hues can often create visual complexity and a sense of chaos for users. Viewers become overwhelmed with all the hues competing for attention and aren’t sure where to fixate their attention or what is being requested of them.

Color Theory: Monochromatic Color Palette

Analogous Colors

Analogous color schemes describe colors that appear near one another on a color wheel. For example an analogous color scheme may include red, pink and magenta. Analogous colors tend to feel very stable when used together while still offering enough variety to retain viewer interest. When used appropriately analogous colors create professional palettes that hold interest and limit confusion.

Color Theory: Analogous Color Palette

Color Scheme and Color Palette Selection Tools

Time to begin experimenting with color palettes using the lessons we have learned throughout the [color theory](#) series. Utilizing [mixing colors](#), the science and math of [color schemes](#), and color harmony we can begin creating cohesive color palettes with far greater ease.

Adobe’s Kuler

Adobe’s Kuler, is an awesome interactive app developed by Adobe that lets you experiment with color hues while utilizing a variety of color rules. Kuler offers many filters or rules that we have covered here such as complementary colors, analogous colors, and monochromatic colors. Kuler also provides many other color filters or rules including triad colors, compound colors, color shades and the ability to define your own custom rules.

Kuler is free to use and features palettes created by other users. This is incredibly handy when you are browsing for color palette ideas or need a base color palette to begin experimenting with. I highly recommend Kuler as a tool to experiment with as you begin to explore color.

Colour Lovers

ColourLovers is another great tool I have used through the years to glean inspiration and assist me in creating palettes. Colourlovers differs a bit from Kuler in that it is less about exploring color and more about sharing and generating ideas and inspiration from palettes created by others. I really enjoy colourlovers patterns section that marries palettes with patterns to create even more ideas when tackling web, home, or print projects.

Color Theory Series

This concludes the color theory series. We have reviewed color mixing, the science and math behind color schemes, and finally color palettes and color harmony. Hopefully this color theory series has rounded out your understanding of color and given you inspiration or at the very least ideas on where to begin exploring color in more depth. Return to the first post in this color theory series and read up on any of the posts you may have missed.

Second Principle of Color Theory: The Science and Math of Color and Color Schemes


Science and Math of Color and Color Schemes - Color Smoke

The Science and Math of Color and Color Schemes: Hue, Saturation, Lightness

Additive and subtractive color mixing help to describe much of color theory, however these foundations were built around pure or ideal colors. Pure or ideal colors and color schemes work well when discussing general theory, but how do we extend this model to colors that we observe in our everyday? For example, the color green and all its variants that we see in the world exist far beyond just the green perceived in the additive and subtractive color mixing models. Color and color schemes that we observe in the real world extend beyond pure colors and is further described with three additional attributes that all colors possess, hue, saturation and lightness.

Hue, saturation and lightness build upon the existing RGB model and you can easily remember that the world holds true to the RGB model by remembering the rainbow. We know that when all the colors of the rainbow are combined we are left with white light. Thus the way we perceive color in the real world holds true to additive color and the RGB model.

Hue (red, orange, hello, green, blue, purple, etc.)

Hue is one of the main properties of color and describes a colors pure color. Additive color does an excellent job describing how certain hues exist relative to one another and how the combination of those hues yields other pure hues. Hue can be thought of as an extension to older color theories that exist. It doesn’t disprove traditional thinking and theories about color, but allows us to expand on it to build a model that supports all cases.

Saturation

Saturation describes the intensity or dullness of a hue. Often described as the colorfulness of a hue. Highly saturated colors appear to be very vibrant and intense. Slightly desaturated hues appear pale or subdued, while completely desaturated colors appear gray.

Lightness

Describes how light or dark a color is with respect to the hue. When a color is at half lightness it is neither tinted or shaded and represents the true hue. Increasing lightness creates more and more tint to a hue until it reaches full lightness and yields white. Decreasing lightness creates a shade that darkens a hue until finally reaching black.

Munsell Color Chart System

The Science and Math of Color

HSL was created by computer scientist to more easily describe and identify colors. The HSL visual representation of the RGB color model can best be interpreted as a cylinder with coordinates that identify a colors attributes. Hue is described by the angular dimension of the cylinder. You have probably seen this representation online or on your computer when selecting colors.

Mac OSX Color Selection Tool

Red is at 0 degrees, green is at 120 degrees, blue is at 240 degrees, and then the cylinder wraps back around to red again at 360 degrees. All other existing hues beyond red, green and blue sit in between each of these three colors and their respective degrees.

Saturation is represented as the radius of the cylinder. The further out from the center you go, the more saturated a color will appear. The center of the cylinder contains washed out or subdued colors, while the edges of the cylinder contain incredibly vibrant colors. Lastly we have lightness positioned in the very center of the cylinder. The very top of the cylinder contains colors with max tint. The bottom of the cylinder contains colors with max shade and thus at the bottom we have black. every shade of grey between them. The height of the cylinder represents lightness. The bottom of the cylinder is completely black, and the top of the cylinder is completely white.

Color Theory Series

Continue on with this series by reading the next installment, Third Principle of Color Theory: Color Palettes and Color Harmony, or feel free to skip to any of the three principles in the color theory series.

Color Theory: 3 Main Principles to Create Color Palettes First Principle of Color Theory: Mixing Colors
Second Principle of Color Theory: The Science and Math of Color Schemes
Third Principle of Color Theory: Color Palettes and Color Harmony

First Principle of Color Theory: Mixing Colors


Color Theory First Principle:  Mixing Colors

Mixing Colors

There are two types or representations of mixing colors, each with their own models. Additive color mixing involves mixing of light or adding of light colors to create new hues. Additive color mixing utilized the popular digital color model RGB. Subtractive color mixing involves removing certain color lights to create new hues. Subtractive color mixing utilizes the popular printing color model CMYK.

If you haven’t had a chance to read Color Theory: 3 Main Principles to Create Color Palettes, please take a look before jumping into my color theory series. It will provide some context and vocabulary to be used throughout the series that may be helpful in understanding color theory.

Color Wheel

This is the color wheel or color star that you are all probably extremely familiar with. This color star generates the color wheel that we are often presented with when selecting colors on a digital medium. Color Theory: RGB Color Star A digital medium you say? Is that why the three primary colors in this color wheel are represented by red, green, and blue? Check out the big brain on you! Colors in a monitor are additive mixtures of light not subtractive mixtures of paints, hence why the color wheel represents the three primary colors of red, green and blue. We will detail additive color and subtractive color below. Just know that red, green, and blue are the primary colors when referencing digital media.

So if our primary colors are red, green and blue, what do you think our secondary colors that consist of mixing primary colors will be? Correct, yellow, magenta, and cyan are the secondary colors in our color wheel. Lastly we can observe the six tertiary colors created when mixing secondary colors with primary colors. Essentially this goes on and on until we have created a complete color wheel.Color Theory: RGB Color Wheel Take some time to review the color star and observe the primary, secondary, and tertiary colors of the RGB model. Now compare the rudimentary color star with the completed color wheel.

Mixing Colors: Additive Color

Additive color mixing involves the mixing of light or adding of light to create color. Additive color mixing revolves around the three primary colors red, green and blue often referred to as RGB. In the presence of all three colors a result of white is displayed, in the absence of all colors black is displayed. Color Theory: Additive Color (RGB) As you can imagine when red and green are combined a resulting hue of yellow is created. Likewise when red and blue are combined a hue of magenta is created and lastly when green and blue are combined a hue of cyan is created.

Mixing Colors: Subtractive Color

Subtractive color mixing involves the removal of certain colors from a combination of hues. Subtractive color mixing revolves around the colors yellow, magenta, and cyan. Note how these are the secondary colors of the additive color mixing method. Color Theory: Subtractive Color (CMYK) It should also be noted that these colors form the CMYK color standard typically referenced in print documents. You may have noticed that your printer takes a black ink cartridge as well as a color cartridge that utilizes cyan, magenta, and yellow or CMY. Hopefully this connected a few dots in your head. Can you guess what the secondary colors of the subtractive color model is? Yep, red, green and blue! Finally all of these colors mixed produces black, and the absence of all these colors creates white.

Color Theory Series

Continue on with this series by reading the next installment, Second Principle of Color Theory: The Science and Math of Color Schemes, or feel free to skip to any of the three principles in the color theory series.

Color Theory: 3 Main Principles to Create Color Palettes First Principle of Color Theory: Mixing Colors
Second Principle of Color Theory: The Science and Math of Color Schemes
Third Principle of Color Theory: Color Palettes and Color Harmony

Color Theory: 3 Main Principles to Create Color Palettes


Color Palettes and Color Theory: 3 Main Principles

Color Theory: 3 Main Principles To Create Color Palettes

Color theory can be broken down into three primary principles, color mixing, the science of color through hue, saturation, and lightness and finally color harmony. Color theory is a practical guide to the logic and mathematics behind why certain colors possess color harmony with one another to create a pleasing color palette. The discipline of color selection and palette creation is both an art and a science, and color theory helps to uncover the mystery behind color.

Color theory isn’t mind blowing and by no means will it make you a color wizard, but it will create an understanding of color and the foundation that will support your creative process with color in the future. This foundation will be the building blocks on your journey to becoming a color wizard. Color isn’t a discipline secluded to just creative types; it isn’t just about creating color palettes for designs. Color plays a huge role in everyone’s lives and intricately weaves itself into daily decisions. Everything from outfit selection to decorating homes, to creating reports or materials for work, when we understand how color works things tend to come together easier and more complete.

Relationships With Color

My experience with color has always been a very judgmental one. I am quick to identify what colors I like, and what color palettes have cohesion and color harmony, however creating a solid color palette or mixing colors from scratch is a far difficult task. I imagine I share this same color relationship with many others. A color relationship that often has us thinking “I don’t know why I like it, I just like it!” More times than not it is because someone spent a considerable amount of time ensuring that color among other things worked in harmony with one another. Even gray scales with their lack of color can appear to be not quite right if not properly considered.

Let’s begin by breaking down the vocabulary often used, and then jump into the principles and science behind the scenes. Then we will review how we can combine our understanding of color with existing tools to help us create color palettes that make us cheer with color glee inside.

Color Vocabulary

Color is often described with many attributes. Without a basic understanding of these attributes color theory can seem a bit over complicated. I will use these terms periodically throughout the reading to help describe color.

  • Hue: Hue is one of the main properties of color and defines an element on a color wheel. Hue’s are often referred to as a pure color having no tint or shade applied.
  • Saturation: Saturation refers to a colors intensity or colorfulness. Colorfulness is the difference between a color at full saturation and a color completely desaturated resulting in a gray color.
  • Lightness: Lightness represents the variation in the perception of colors brightness. 100% lightness results in white, while 0% lightness results in black.
  • Primary Colors: Primary colors are sets of colors, typically three, that can be mixed to generate a range of colors.
  • Secondary Colors: The combination of two primary colors results in the creation of a secondary color.
  • Tertiary Colors: The combination of a primary and secondary color results in the creation of a tertiary color.
  • RGB: RGB model is an additive color model in which the primary colors, red, green, and blue, are added together to produce a range of colors. The model comes from the initials of the three additive primary colors.
  • CMYK: CMYK model is a subtractive color model in which the primary colors, cyan, magenta, and yellow are added to subtract light colors. CMYK is used in color printing and describes the printing process itself.
  • Color Palette: A color palette is a finite number of colors selected from a wide range of colors that share cohesive qualities with one another and create color harmony. Color palettes can range from three to many colors, but typically are limited to no more than ten.
  • Tint: Adding white to a color creates what is called a tint.
  • Shade: Adding black to a color creates what is called a shade.

Color Theory Series

Continue on with this series by reading the next installment, First Principle of Color Theory: Mixing Colors, or feel free to skip to any of the three principles in the color theory series.

Color Theory: 3 Main Principles to Create Color Palettes First Principle of Color Theory: Mixing Colors
Second Principle of Color Theory: The Science and Math of Color Schemes
Third Principle of Color Theory: Color Palettes and Color Harmony

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About Me Dal Price: SwissMisfit

I’m Dal, an enthusiast for all things technology, design, music, and food. This is a collection of inspirations, misfit thoughts, and random musings that may or may not be interesting to others.

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